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TENT AND STOVE INFO GUIDE

TENT INSTRUCTIONS

BEFORE PURCHASING CANVAS TENTS, YOU MUST DETERMINE

Canvas Tent Standard features

Canvas Tent cost comparison:

  • Tent Terminology:

Canvas Tent Standard features

  • Determine the standard features canvas tents have that you are considering and the cost of additional features/options you want.
  • Most canvas tent buyers want at the minimum these standard features:
    • Front door with zipper
    • Stove jack
    • 9" - 10" vinyl sod cloth to keep canvas tents clean and sealed against the ground
    • Rope with tensioners
    • Tent stakes
  • It should be noted that all tent canvas used in US and Canadian manufactured canvas tents is imported from primarily Pakistan, India and lately China. Where the canvas is made is not a factor since tent canvas that is imported to the US must meet US canvas specifications, i.e. Army Duck, Boat shrunk, Marine Grade, 10.1 oz., 12 oz. etc. Imported fire treated canvas must meet Federal and State fire treatment requirements.

I am constantly asked about the differences in the 2 main tents I sell. Below is a matrix comparing standard features.

STANDARD TENT FEATURES WILDERNESS MONTANA
Army Duck Canvas- Double Fill Yes No- Single
Free Back Door or Yes $44
Free Back Window Yes $40
Webbing on Eave with D Rings (reinforced) Yes Grommets
Extra Layer of Canvas on Ridge (reinforced) Yes Yes
8" Storm Flap to Protect Zippered Door Yes Yes
Free Tent Bag Yes Yes
Reinforced Ridge Ends & Eave Ends Yes Yes
Stove Pipe Opening Yes Yes
Ridge Opening for Lodge Pole Frame Yes- Flap Yes - Flap
Vinyl Sod Cloth Yes Yes
Tie own Ropes & Tensioners Yes Yes
Stakes No No
Water & Mildew Treatment Marine Grade Paraffin
Front Zippered Door Yes Yes

Canvas Tent cost comparison:

  • If the canvas tents you are considering purchasing do not have the standard features listed above, you need to add the costs of those features to the price of the tent before you can make a valid tent comparison.
  • Some canvas tent manufacturers list common standard features as options to increase the price of the tent from an initial low advertising price.

SUNFORGER INFO:

SUNFORGER IS A WATER & MILDEW TREATMENT ADDED TO CANVAS - it is not a type of canvas.

" ALL "TREATED CANVAS IS IMPORTED FROM CHINA, INDIA & PAKISTAN

THERE ARE 3 TYPES OF WATER & MILDEW TREATMENT: SUNFORGER, PARAFFIN & MARINE GRADE.

WE SELL DIFFERENT MODELS OF TENTS USING ALL 3 DIFFERENT TREATMENTS. THERE IS NO DIFFERENCE IN THE QUALITY OF THESE WATER & MILDEW TREATMENTS.

IF SOMEONE TELLS YOU THERE IS A DIFFERENCE IN QUALITY - IT IS BECAUSE THAT PARTICULAR COMPANY TREATMENT IS ALL THAT COMPANY SELLS.

STRENGTH OF CANVAS IS BASED ON THE QUALITY OF CANVAS - NOT THE TREATMENT.

IF YOU START THE WATER & MILDEW TREATMENT PROCESS WITH GOOD QUALITY OR POOR QUALITY CANVAS - YOU WILL END UP WITH THE SAME QUALITY OF CANVAS REGARDLESS OF WHAT WATER & MILDEW TREATMENT IS APPLIED TO THE CANVAS.

IF SOMEONE TELLS YOU THERE IS A DIFFERENCE IN THE QUALITY OF WATER & MILDEW TREATMENTS IT IS BECAUSE THAT COMPANY SELLS ONLY THAT PARTICULAR TREATMENT AND THEY ARE TRYING A HARD SELL APPROACH ON YOU.

BASED ON MY EXPERIENCE SELLING THOUSANDS OF TENTS, AND CUSTOMER COMMENTS, ANY CLAIM SUNFORGER IS A BETTER WATER & MILDEW TREATMENT IS JUST A PERSONAL OPINION.

IT IS THE SAME TYPE OF CLAIM WHEN A PERSON SAYS HIS DODGE TRUCK IS BETTER THAN A FORD OR A CHEVY. IT IS ALL PERSONAL PREFERENCE.

IF YOU LIKE MARINE GRADE VIEW OUR WILDERNESS TENTS.

IF YOU LIKE PARRAFIN TREATMENT VIEW OUR MONTANA TENTS.

IF YOU LIKE SUNFORGER, VIEW OUR HUNTER TENTS.

YOU WILL BE HAPPY WITH ANY ANYONE OF THOSE 3 TENTS - USING ANY ONE OF THE 3 WATER & MILDEW TREATMENTS.


Tent Purchase Recommendations:

  • Zipper Door: I recommend a back door w/zipper or window for cross ventilation for hot weather. Being in a canvas tent w/out a back door or window is miserable during hot weather.
  • SIZE OF TENT: If you can't decide between 2 sizes of tents , go far the larger tent. I have never heard anyone say they wished they had bought a smaller tent. When people complain about the size of the tent, the complaint is the tent is too small for their requirements.
  • FLY: Fly is always recommended. Sometimes during rainy days, a canvas tent will leak where the canvas touches the frame. If this wicking/leaking occurs the only solution is to purchase a tent fly. The fly prevents prevents any rain or snow from touching the canvas so no wicking/leaking can occur. THE MAJOR BENEFITS  of a fly is (1)  that it prevents sparks from the stovepipe burning holes in your canvas roof (2) protects canvas from ultraviolet rays which deteriorates the canvas (3) keeps your tent roof clean from tree pitch (4) creates air space between the roof and fly which acts an insulation area which helps keep your tent warmer.
  • Tent Bag: I strongly recommend a tent bag to keep your tent clean during hauling and storage.
  • Options: If you are not sure about a option I would probably add it. It is much cheaper to add options while the tent is under construction compared to costs after you take delivery. (Been there done that!)
  • Color of tent: I encourage you to purchase a tent that is white. White reflects lantern light much better than off white or colored tents.
  • Cooks shack. A cooks shack. costs almost as much as a tent of equal size. Sometimes it makes more sense to buy another tent to use as a cooks shack. and have the flexibility of using the smaller tent when less people go hunting or camping.
  • Color of Fly. A clear translucent fly is best as it allows light to pass through it. If you use a dark fly during the day it will be much darker inside your tent.
  • Reinforced eaves. The eaves have the most pressure on a tent due to tightening the roof by use of guy ropes and stakes. If a tent fails due to snow loads, the tent normally tears near the eaves and grommets. Insure whatever tent you buy has reinforced eaves. The Wilderness tent has the strongest eave support available with its webbing and D ring.

Cost of tent frame:

  • Metal frames are very expensive to ship. You might want to purchase an angle kit and make your own frame from 1" electrical metal conduit. You can purchase conduit at local hardware stores.
  • If you are horse or mule packing you can use ropes, lodge poles, trees near your tent to put up your tent.
  • Purchasing metal frames vary tremendously between companies and has to be a major consideration where you purchase your canvas tent.

Understanding Tent Terminology:

  • Before you purchase a tent you must know the definitions of tent terminology in order to compare tent quality and price.

  • Tent Terminology:
    • Army Duck - Double Fill: The highest quality canvas made. Canvas is made by weaving threads together, crosswise and lengthwise. The Army Duck canvas has 2 threads twisted together making 1 thread, these double twisted threads are woven into the canvas going both crosswise and lengthwise. Twisting 2 threads together into 1 makes Army Duck stronger more durable, and also allows the canvas to breath better. A 10.1 oz. Army Duck is probably just as strong as a 12 oz. Dual Fill.
    • Dual Fill: Two threads are twisted together to make one thread for all threads going only crosswise in the canvas. Threads going lengthwise in the canvas are only single threads. Dual fill does not meet Army Duck manufacturing specifications.
    • Single Fill: Single threads are woven together both crosswise and lengthwise to make the canvas.
    • Untreated Army Duck: Army Duck is naturally water repellant, but untreated. When you put this tent away it must be completely dry or it will mildew and rot. Additionally, all untreated canvas will shrink each time it gets wet. Consequently, you will have to cut your tent frame constantly. Untreated canvas will shrink at least 10%, making your tent 10% smaller! Only purchase untreated canvas if you summer camp or you are willing to take the time for its extra care in storing and you can deal with continually cutting down your tent frame. The best frame for untreated canvas is a lodge pole A-Frame so you won't be continually cutting down your expensive internal frame.
    • Blend tent is available/recommended for individuals who prefer a lightweight tent or pack tent. Canvas roof and relite walls (synthetic material). Saves approximately 40% in weight from a standard 10.1 oz. canvas tent. Blend tents lighter weight makes larger tents much easier to transport, set up and take down.
    • Reenactor/Rendezvous Tent: Tent made to look like tents made during the Civil War, fur trade, Revolutionary War, Medieval. No modern features such as zippers, nylon.
    • WATER MILDEW TREATMENTS
    • There are 3 different types of water mildew treatment
      1) Marine Grade Boat shrunk (2) Sunforger, (3)Paraffin are the terms used to state the canvas has been treated for water and mildew resistance. Water and mildew treated tents will not normally shrink more than 1-2 %. Water/mildew treatment is worth the extra expense.
    • There is no difference in the quality of these water mildew treatments. I sell different models of tents with each of the 3 water mildew treatments. After selling thousands of tents, there is no benefit of one water mildew treatment over the other.
    • Water/mildew treated tents will not shrink more than 3%. Water/mildew treatment is worth the extra expense.
      • Recommendation: Do not purchase untreated canvas then apply a water resistance material like "Thompson's Water Sealer". By applying your own water resistant treatment you plug up the spaces between the threads which will prevent your tent to breathe. Therefore your canvas tent will have condensation inside the tent just like a synthetic material tent such as Relite or Tex-Tex.
      • Recommendation: Do not purchase a tent that is not treated for water/mildew as it will shrink 10-15% when it gets wet.
    • Fire Resistant: Meets CPAI 84 fire retardant code. If a tent is not specifically treated for fire resistance it will burn quickly. Fire Resistant will only burn when there is a flame source present on the canvas. When you remove the flame source the tent will stop burning. However, there is no tent made that will not burn.
      • Recommendation: I strongly recommend you consider fire treatment. The additional expense is worth the peace of mind that your tent will not readily catch on fire.
      • Recommendation: Do not buy a tent that is not treated for fire resistance and then apply a fire retardant. By applying your own fire resistant treatment you plug up the spaces between the threads which will prevent your tent to breathe. Therefore your canvas tent will have condensation inside the tent just like a synthetic material tent such as Relite or Tex-Tex.
    • Parafan Finish: An exceptionally heavy finish that treats canvas for water, mildew and fire resistance. However, significant weight is added to the tent.

  • Relite: A synthetic fabric. Tents made of synthetic fabrics don't breathe and may condensate. Using a propane stove or boiling water will cause condensation. A wood burning stove usually helps prevent condensation caused by breathing. Opening a window several inches also prevents condensation. Relite will not shrink 1-3% like canvas and no shrinkage reduction factor is required for an internal frame. Synthetic tents are much lighter for packing but you must determine if the reduced weight is worth condensation inside your tent. Relite is as strong as canvas and  retains heat inside the tent equal to canvas. However, sparks will burn a hole in Relite much easier than canvas. If you purchase a Relite or Tex-Tex tent I recommend a fly to protect the Relite or Tex-Tex tent from sparks.
      • Recommendation: Unless weight is extremely critical, I would recommend a blend tent (canvas roof and relite walls) over an all synthetic tent if you want to reduce tent weight. The canvas roof allows the tent to breathe and reduces condensation and reduces the possibility of a spark hole in the tent roof.
      • Recommendation: If you plan on buying a relite tent I recommend a pellet or wood burning stove. Propane stoves cause condensation. Boiling water also causes condensation.
    • Canvas Weight: Heavier canvas is not necessarily better. Double Fill weave both length wise and crosswise (Army Duck), water/mildew/fire treatment determines the quality of the tent - not the canvas weight.
    • Sod Cloth: Normally a piece of 9 " - 10" vinyl that is sewn to the bottom of all tent walls. The sod cloth acts as an air seal and helps keep the tent clean since the vinyl sod cloth is touching the ground instead of the canvas.
    • Eave: Location where roof and side wall meet with a 2"- 4" overhang.
    • Eave Socks: Openings at the end of the eaves that allows connecting a tent internal frame to the porch/awning/cook shack frame.
    • Floor: Can be sewn in, staked, or attached to tent with D-rings.
      • Recommendation:Don't have sewn in a floor when using an internal frame as it is extremely difficult to set up.
      • Recommendation: Always have fireproof material underneath the stove with a 2 foot radius  or cut out/ zippered are floor where stove is located when using a floor.
    • Fly: Waterproof material used to cover tent roof. Protects canvas tents from sparks, UV rays, moisture and allows snow to slide off easier. A factory fly has an area cut out for the stove jack and has a flap.
      • Recommendation: Buy a fly to protect your roof from sparks or if you are going to leave your tent setup for extended periods of time. UV rays are very damaging to canvas.
    • Awning: Extension of roof only. Sides and front open. Can be sewn on or extension with 8-12 inch overlap.
    • Porch: Extension of roof and walls of the tent. Front is open. Porch can be sewn to tent or extension with 8-12 inch overlap.
    • Cook Shack/Kitchen: Extension of roof, walls, front enclosed with a door. Cook shack provides a totally enclosed area for storage and cooking. Can be sewn on or extension with 8-12 inch overlap.
    • Swedged: A tent frame piece necked down to fit into another tent frame piece or angle.

  • Tent Frames: There are four basic types of tent frames:
    • Internal frame. Galvanized steel tent frame or aluminum tent frame are normally used by individuals camping near a road. However, an aluminum tent frame can be easily packed. Internal frames are recommended as the internal frame rafters provide roof support. Other types of frames do not have rafters.
    • An angle kit can be purchased and you can easily make your own frame. Purchase 1" electrical conduit at a local hardware store. The angle kit costs and your purchase of 1" conduit is much cheaper than purchasing and shipping an entire tent frame. It is recommended to have a rafter every 6' or less to prevent tent roof sagging and to increase snow load carrying capacity. Click angle kit to view angle kit instructions to make your own tent frame.
    • A Frame. Galvanized steel. Used near a road or packing in. Click for wall tent A frame information and prices.
    • Lodge pole Frame. Normally used by people who pack in and make their own frame from lodge poles. Click to view picture of a Lodge pole frame.

Note: Internal frames should be reduced 1 - 2% for new tents to allow for tent canvas shrinkage.

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General Information:

  • Visualize Size of Canvas Tents: If you can't decide on what size of tent you need I suggest you chalk out the tent sizes you are considering on your driveway. Visualize or actually place items in your tent chalk box. Note: The first 7 feet of your tent wall should be reserved for a stove and stand off area.
  • DETERMINING WHAT CANVAS TENT SIZE TO BUY: The amount of square footage in a tent increases tremendously when going up one size in a tent. Insure you buy the tent size that fully meets your requirements. Also compare the price difference between the 2 tent sizes you are considering vs the increase in square footage gained by purchasing the larger tent size a.
  • A 10x12 (120 square feet) is 50% larger than a 8x10 (80 square feet)
  • b. A 12x14 (168 square feet) is 40% larger than a 10x12 (120 square feet .
  • c. A 14x16 (224 square feet) is 33% larger than a 12x14 (168 square feet)
  • d. A 16x20 (320 square feet) is 42% larger than a 14x16 (224 square feet)
  • e. A 16x24 (384 square feet) is 20% larger than a 16x20 (320 square feet)
  • f. A 18x24 (432 square feet) is 13% larger than a 16x24 (384 square feet)
  • Zipper Door vs Tie Door: A zippered door keeps warm air in and cold air out better than tie doors. If you use a tent in cold weather I would recommend a zippered door.
  • Metal Zipper vs Neoprene Zipper: Most tent makers use YKK #10 neoprene zippers. A metal zipper freezes more easily than neoprene. Also metal zippers that are bent become unserviceable. However, some tent makers use metal zippers as a selling point but you have to decide which is best for you.
  • Stove Inside of Tent: Never place a stove on a canvas or synthetic floor for safety. Most factory floors have a cut out or zippered area for the stove.
  • Actual Size of Tent: Most canvas tents made by tent makers are not made to the exact size ordered. For example a 12'x14' might actually be 11'8"x 14'6" because rolls of canvas can differ by three or four inches.
  • Tent Life Expectancy: A good quality tent should last the typical person 20-30 years. Leaving the tent set up for long periods of time (months) in the sun, without a fly, and storing the tent wet are the two main factors that affect tent life expectancy.

Tent Maintenance:

  • Zipper Maintenance: Always have zipper unzipped when placing/removing tent over frame to prevent too much stress on zipper. As your tent roof shrinks the tent will fit tighter on the frame and increase stress on the door zipper.
    • Recommendation: Cut rafters down as necessary to prevent unnecessary stress on zipper. You do not want to be camping in cold weather and have an unserviceable zipper.
  • Mildew: If you have mildew on your canvas tent mix 2 cups of bleach in a 5 gallon bucket. Wash only the area with mildew. A tent with mildew will leak at the mildew spot regardless if treated with bleach.
  • Washing Tent: Use only mild detergent like "Woollite". Use a hose and scrub lightly.
  • Storage: Never store damp or wet canvas tents. Always let the tent dry naturally. Your tent will get mildew if stored wet regardless if you have a mildew treated tent.
  • Cleaning Tent: Always brush off caked on dirt or mud (let mud dry) with a soft brush.
  • UV Rays: Long exposure to the sun's UV rays will damage all canvas tents. A fly is recommended to prevent UV damage if you set up your tent 2-3 weeks or longer annually. A tent fly also keeps your tent roof clean, snow slides off the tent better and acts as another weather barrier.
  • Leaking Seams: Use Canvak tent sealer to stop leaking seams or purchase a fly.
  • Stoves or Lanterns: Keep stoves, propane cook stoves and lanterns away from canvas.
  • Set up Location: Be aware of which trees emit resins and avoid setting up under these types of trees.

Internal Frames:

  • If your frame is not marked, color code your tent frame parts, i.e., legs, rafters and tent lengths at 1-2" from ends where the paint will be hidden in the angle joints.
  • Clean Your Frame: If the frame has a coating that makes your hands dirty. Dirty hands results in a dirty tent.
  • If you are making your own tent frame and do not feel confident, you may not want to allow any shrinkage the first cut. After you place the tent on the frame you can decide how much more you need to cut the frame down. If you cut the frame too small initially you will have to repurchase all the EMT pipe.

Setting up Internal Frame & Tent:

  • Remove rocks and sticks in tent set up area.
  • Determine tent orientation. Set up your tent so the prevailing winds blow sparks and ashes from your stove pipe away from the tent. Sparks landing on a roof can burn holes in your roof and ash will cause your tent to get dirty.
  • Lay tent floor on ground where tent is to be located. By using a floor your tent will stay cleaner during set up and take down. I also have a cheap indoor outdoor carpet that folds like canvas that I put on top of the floor. I place the tent on the carpet as sometimes the tent can get dirty from a dusty/dirty floor.
  • Position angles and tent frame on floor in appropriate location for set up.
  • Assemble tent frame except legs on one side. By installing legs on one side of the tent frame ridge will be 5-6' high to allow you to easily drape tent over ridge. If your tent has a tall ridge line, like a Montana canvas tent, it is best not to install the legs as the ridge line will be too high to drape the tent over the ridge when legs are on one side of the frame.
  • Unzip all door zippers to prevent strain on zippers.
  • Drape tent over frame. Fold the sidewalls in toward the inside of the roof to keep sidewalls off the ground.
  • In windy conditions, secure tent ridge guy ropes to tent roof end grommets.
  • Install legs
  • Adjust your tent to the frame. Do not pull hard on your tent or you will weaken seams and zipper doors. If tent is too tight you must cut down your frame rafters or tent length as necessary. The tent should be snug on the frame but not taunt or require any forcing to make the tent fit the frame.
  • Over the lifetime of your tent your tent may continue to shrink slightly and require you to cut down the frame.
  • If your door zipper is tight you must cut down the rafters to reduce stress on the zipper.
  • Place sod cloth under floor for an air seal and to prevent any rain water from getting on top of floor. Some campers that do not have a floor put the sod cloth to the outside to direct rain water away from the tent.
  • Install stakes and guy ropes and tensioners. Stakes should be driven in at a 45º angle away from the tent. Guy ropes are at the same angle as the tent roof. If I am in an area with high winds I tie my guy ropes to trees, stumps or logs. Another method is to have two guy ropes/stakes for each eave corner.
  • If rain is possible, dig a 4-6" wide trench 2-3" deep around your tent to insure water drains away from your tent.
  • TAKING DOWN TENT. Reverse the sequence provided
  • Also clean your sod cloth before taking down the tent. The sod cloth touches the ground and will be very dirty or muddy if has rained. The dirt on the sod cloth will dirty your tent if not cleaned.
  • ALWAYS have the inside of the tent touching other parts of the inside of the tent when taking down the tent or when folding the tent for storage. The outside of your tent always has dirt, dust, tree pitch etc on it. If the outside parts of your canvas touches the inside of the tent - your inside part of your tent will be dirty- and you will have to look at the dirt while you are in the tent.
  • The tent set up and take down procedures outlined should help keep your tent clean for years.

Shrinking Your Tent to Your Internal Frame:

  • Ensure you have guy ropes on your tent and leave some slack to compensate for tent shrinkage.
  • It is imperative that when you wet your tent you through soak the seams. There are small needle holes where the seams are sewn together.
  • Thoroughly soaking the seams normally closes the needle holes which will prevent tent seam leakage.
  • Wetting down the tent causes the cotton fibers to swell which makes a tighter weave increasing water resistance.

Taking Down Canvas Tents:

  • Clean your sod cloth. If your sod cloth is dirty you will get the inside of your tent dirty.
  • Unzip your door zippers.
  • Fold your tent walls to the inside so the inside of your tent always touches the inside of the tent walls to keep your tent cleaner.
  • Do not pull out the wall stakes out by using the canvas wall as you might damage your tent. A Claw hammer is recommended.
  • Take down in reverse order of assembly.

Tent Frame on a Platform: If you plan on placing your tent frame and tent on a platform I have some recommendations.

  • Building the platform: Do not build the platform until you receive the tent and measure it. Most canvas tents are either smaller or larger than the tent stated dimensions.
  • Platform size: Build the platform to the same width as the frame. In this way the rain water run downs the roof over the eaves and prevents most water from puddling on the platform and coming inside the tent. Also place the tent frame flush with the back of the platform to prevent rain water from coming in from the back.
  • Rain water gap in platform: If you have a porch area and use plywood, cut a 1/2" gap in the plywood immediately in front of the tent. This gap will prevent rain water from coming in the front of the tent. If using 2x6's for the porch insure the 2x6's run parallel to the front of the tent and allow a 1/2" gap between boards immediately in front of the tent.
  • Platform sill/perimeter board: If using an internal frame, place a 2x4 along the perimeter of the tent area on the platform. Drill a hole in the sill board for the tent frame legs. In this way the wall tent frame can't move/slide on the smooth platform surface during high winds. It is also probably a good idea to caulk under the sill boards to prevent any water from coming in from the sides.
  • Sod cloth board: Place a a 1/4" shim on each corner and screw/nail a 2x6 board even with the top of the platform along the back and 2 sides. Insert the sod cloth in the space between the 2x6 and platform. The sod cloth now will not go upward in raining, windy conditions preventing any wind or rain from coming in the tent.
  • Guy ropes: Install eyebolts near the bottom of the platform on the sides and back. Tie your guy ropes to the eyebolts. In this procedure, you will keep the ropes out of your way instead of having the ropes being at a 45º from your eaves.
  • Fly: Tents on platforms are usually set up for long periods of time and a fly is recommended. A fly protects the tent from destructive UV rays, provides another moisture barrier, prevents any stove sparks from burning small hole in our tent roof, and also keeps your roof clean form the tree sap, etc
  • Fly Hitching Rail: Build a hitching rail 6" higher than the eave and 6" away and parallel to the eave to tie your fly ropes to. This hitching rail will preclude having fly ropes around your tent.
  • Floor: I prefer a loose waterproof floor as it allows the use of a perimeter sill board. The waterproof floor is definitely necessary if there is any possibility that rain water will get inside your tent.
  • Carpet: You can use indoor/outdoor carpet and keep it dry if you have an effective rain perimeter sill board and rain gap at the front of your tent. Carpets are much more comfortable to walk on than vinyl or wood floors. However, you must have a fireproof material under your stove and 2' around your stove. Carpets are very flammable and extreme caution must be used. Use a carpet at your own risk.
  • Snow loads: Some individuals want to leave their tents up in the winter. There is no internal frame that can withstand heavy snow loads. I know outfitters that had to leave tents in the back country over the winter because they had to leave quickly with their clients due to heavy snowstorms to make it back to their road base camps before the horse trails became impassable. Their tents were torn and frames destroyed when the outfitters retrieved their gear in the spring.
  • TENT RIDGE HEIGHTS:
  • Canvas tents ridge heights can vary approximately 1 foot in different tent model sizes 12x14 and larger. The taller ridge height, with the sharper roof angle, helps rain flow off the roof quicker and snow to be removed from the roof easier.
  • The higher ridge height also provides more headroom inside the tent along the sidewalls because the angle of the roof is sharper. The major drawback to higher ridge height is that tents with higher ridges are harder to heat. The higher the ridge, the more heat is at/near the ridge line. It is the same principle as if you were trying to heat a house with an 8' ceiling vs a 9' ceiling.

Fly: If you already have a tent and need a fly I will need the following tent info:

  • Stove jack located in roof
    • length of tent slope, roof distance from top of ridge to the center of the stove jack
    • distance from the end wall to the center of the stove jack in the roof
    • tent roof length
  • Stove jack not located in roof
    • length of tent
    • slope of tent

Floor: If you already have a tent and just need a loose floor I need the following tent measurements: length of tent and width of tent

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RECOMMENDATIONS:

1. NO STOVEJACK IN SIDE WALLS OR END WALLS: I do not recommend a stove jack in the side wall or end wall due to numerous drawbacks. It should be noted that a stove jack in the side wall or end wall requires an adjustable elbow on the stove and an adjustable elbow on the outside of the tent to allow the stovepipe to go straight up for a better draft. Additionally, there must be some type of metal support on the outside of the tent to support the stove pipe. Otherwise your stove pipe will get loose and smoke will get in your tent. Another drawback is that you cannot use nesting pipe when you use an elbow to turn the stove pipe upwards on the outside of your tent. Remember, nesting pipe has a different size of pipe for each pipe section. If you decide to put your stove jack in the sidewall or end wall, I recommend you use metal screws to attach the stove pipe to the stove to prevent the stove pipe coming loose at the stove.

2. DO NOT ALLOW SNOW TO ACCUMULATE ON TENT OR HAVE A WATER TROUGH NEAR THE ROOF EAVE: Always knock off snow to insure your frame or roof is damaged. Keep you tent roof tight by adjusting guy ropes to prevent a rainwater trough on the roof near the eaves.

3. FLOORS: I recommend heavy vinyl floors over canvas or relite. A canvas waterproof floor will eventually soak up water. A relite floor is thin and can be punctured easier than a vinyl floor. Put your sod cloth to the inside and put your floor on top of the sod cloth which forces any water under the floor and helps keep insects out.

4. SEWN IN FLOOR: I do not like sewn in floors in canvas tents due to the increased difficulty of setting up a frame while you are inside the tent. However, under certain circumstances a sewn in floor is recommended:

  • Snakes. Certain parts of the country have lots of snakes. The sewn in floor is one way to help keep a snake out of your tent.
  • Mice. At night mice will come inside of your tent for food. I set 6 mouse traps at night to reduce the mouse problem. However if you are a light sleeper the mouse traps going off at night might wake up. Sewn in floor helps prevents mice coming in the tent. Wife or children that are very concerned about insects, snakes, mice etc.
  • Setting up your tent for long periods of time.

5. TENT STAKES: I prefer to use 5/8" rebar cut 2' long for my corner guy ropes and 18" long rebar for my non corner ropes. I like/recommend longer stakes than normal in order to better secure the tent during high winds. By having longer than necessary stakes you can use one stake for both the tent guy ropes and fly guy ropes thus reducing the total number of stakes required. Most lumber yards will cut your rebar free for your required rebar lengths. I like to have a 3" piece of rebar welded about 1 " from the top forming a "T". Tie the fly guy ropes just below the top "T" of the rebar and the "T" prevents the fly guy rope from slipping off the top. For the tent eave ropes weld another 3" piece of rebar about 6-inches from the top of the rebar. Tie the tent eaves guy ropes to the lower "T".

6.STORING TENT FOR THE WINTER. YOU MUST INSURE YOUR TENT IS TOTALLY DRY , INCLUDING GUY ROPES BEFORE STORING YOUR TENT. Regardless of what type of treatment you have on your tent, I guarantee you will have mildew and rot on your tent if you store the tent when it is damp or wet. If you can't set up a wet tent outside to dry properly, your only option is to hang the tent in a shop or garage. If you don't want to set up a frame, use a rope for a ridge pole and secure the guy ropes to something to pull the roof fairly tight. Leave the garage or shop open if possible to let the wind help dry the tent. Double check to insure your guy ropes are dry if you store them with the tent. Anywhere a wet guy rope touches the tent will cause the canvas to mildew and rot. If you are unfortunate and have mildew or rot on your tent, your tent will never be water resistant in the areas of rot/mildew unless you apply canvak to the dry rot/mildew areas after you clean the area with diluted bleach water. Only apply the bleach water blend to Outfitter Tents on the rotted area as the bleach concentrate will destroy the water/ mildew treatment on any area it is used. If you ever have rot or mold on the roof, I would just bite the bullet and buy a fly to insure your roof doesn't leak when you are hunting or camping.

7. FLY. Never let your tent fly lay on the tent roof. A fly should rest on the ridge and have a gap of 3-4 inches at the eave allowing airflow to dry out any moisture on the tent roof. If you let the fly lay on the tent roof you increase the possibility of mildew forming on your tent roof. And increases the probability of a spark burning through the fly and then burning a hole in your roof.

8. STOVE PIPE ABOVE RIDGE OF TENT: It is best to have your stove pipe long enough to extend 6 inches or more above the tent ridge. Having the stove pipe above the tent ridge allows the wind coming from any direction to blow sparks away the tent roof thus reducing the possibility of spark holes being burnt in the roof.

9. FIRE TREATED CANVAS TENTS VS STOVE SPARKS: Stove sparks will even burn holes in a fire treated roof. A spark arrestor will prevent most sparks from reaching your roof. However, the only 100 per cent method to prevent spark holes in a tent roof is to use a fly to protect the roof.

10. REDUCE SMOKE ODOR IN YOUR HUNTING TENT: To reduce smoke in your tent always open the stove door slowly with the damper wide open. If you open the stove door quickly , the smoke is drawn into the tent.

11. CREOSOTE BUILD UP IN YOUR STOVE PIPE: The more you damper the stove pipe down or/and reduce the air intake on the stove door the more creosote build up you will have in the stove pipe and spark arrestor. If you get too much creosote in the stove pipe you can possibly have a fire in your stove pipe. When breaking camp, remove the creosote in your stove pipe by gently banging the stove pipes together to loosen the creosote. It is normal to periodically clean the spark arrestor every 2-3 days.

13. MILDEW AND ROT: Storing a wet canvas tent will cause the canvas to rot regardless of what type of water mildew treatment you have on your canvas. If setting up your tent outside to dry after hunting season is not an option, I strongly suggest you set the tent up in a garage or work shop until it is completely dry.

14. PYRAMID TENT: Using a pyramid tent in heavy snow it is best use a rope through the roof opening and tie the rope to a tree limb which will reduce the amount of snow on the tent. Remember, the snow load on a pyramid tent has all the pressure on the pyramid peak.

15. HEAVY SNOWS: To reduce the possibility of frame failure during heavy snow loads it is a good idea to use a lodge pole to support the middle of the ridge.

16. DRYING RACK INSIDE TENT: Tie 2 loops about 8' in diameter 7' apart to your ridge frame. Slide a 8' piece of conduit through the loops. This 8' conduit makes a good drying rack as your stove heat rises to your tent ceiling.

17. STOVE SIZE: Buy a stove 1 size larger than recommended for your tent. You can always put less wood in a large stove if high heat is not required. However, the large stove gives you the capability for much more heat in very cold and wet conditions.

FOR INDIVIDUALS PACKING IN ON PACK ANIMALS - SETTING UP CANVAS TENTS USING LODGEPOLES:

Individuals packing in on pack animals sometimes use a Lodge pole frame to save weight and space instead of packing in tent frames. General recommendations and guidance:

  • Use a tent with a reinforced tent ridge/extra layer of canvas. It is very easy to poke a hole or tear the tent ridge if you do not properly remove/smooth the lodge branch even with the lodge pole.
  • When selecting poles for pitching a tent, try to use poles that do not taper much. A minimum diameter of four inches (on the smaller end) is preferable. Young Lodge pole pine trees make ideal poles for this purpose.
  • Use the best pole (clean and strong) for the ridgepole as it takes the most stress and is the most difficult to change should something go wrong.
  • When attaching one pole to another, lash them together with rope and or drive pole spikes through them.
  • The best way to tightly secure the two poles forming the "A" of the lodge pole frame is to lay two poles on the ground on top of one another. Tie a rope tightly around both small ends of the lodge poles. about one foot from the top. Then spread out the two poles to form an "A". You can secure the "A" poles much tighter this way than making an "A" from the two poles then tying the two poles together.
  • If you are likely to us the same campsite in the future you should cache the poles when breaking camp. It is best to tie your Lodge pole frames up against a tree to get them off the ground, If you leave the poles on the ground they will start to rot and weaken much quicker. The poles can give you many years of service if you care for them.

FRAMES:

  • Most frames have two piece rafters and two piece tent lengths. If you have a 8' bed on your pick up, tape the 2 pieces of your tent frame lengths and rafters together. Taping together the two pieces of the tent lengths and rafters together reduces the number of poles about in half and significantly reduces tent set up and take down time.
  • Frame bags make transporting and storing tent frames much easier.
  • If you fold the tent sod cloth to the inside of the tent, place something under the legs so the legs will not wear a hole in the sod cloth. Use patio chair leg caps or small 6"x6" carpet remnants works fine.
  • A tent should never fit tight on a tent frame. A tight fit puts pressure on the seams and zippers and will eventually cause damage.

Hunting Tent Frames: recommend an internal frame as it provides the most roof support. Frames that do not have rafters, such as the A-frame, lodge pole and elk frame, put much more pressure and weight under snow loads on the tent ridge and eaves where guy ropes are tied to the grommets or d-rings. Canvas Tents with significant snow loads have a much higher probability of tearing or splitting when an internal frame is not used.

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TENT SET UP INSTRUCTIONS

When You Receive Your New Canvas Wall Tent FIRST DO THE FOLLOWING: Before using your new tent I recommend you wet it down on your frame. When wetting canvas wall tents, especially the seams for shrinkage, insure that you have wall stakes and guy ropes/side ropes on your new tent to insure it only shrinks the normal 1-3% shrinkage and that it shrinks evenly. If guy ropes and stakes are not used it may shrink more than 3% and unevenly and won't fit your internal frame properly.

Setting up Internal Frame & Canvas Wall Tents:

  • Remove rocks and sticks in set up area.
  • Lay tent floor on ground where tent is to be located. By using a floor your tent will stay cleaner during set up and take down.
  • Position angles and frame on floor in appropriate location for set up.
  • Assemble frame except legs on one side. By installing legs on only one side of the frame, the ridge will be 5-6' high to allow you to easily drape tent over ridge. If your tent has a tall roof line it is best to not install legs. On Montana Tents do not install legs due to the ridge height.
  • Unzip all door zippers to prevent strain on zippers.
  • Drape tent over frame. Fold the sidewalls in toward the inside of the roof to keep sidewalls off the ground.
  • Put fly over canvas wall tent.
  • Install legs on remaining side
  • Adjust your tent to the frame. Do not pull hard on canvas wall tents or you will weaken seams and zipper doors. If tent is too tight you must cut down your frame rafters or tent length as necessary. The tent should be snug on the frame but not taunt or require any forcing to make it fit the frame.
  • Over the lifetime of your canvas wall tent it may continue to shrink slightly and require you to cut down the frame.
  • If your door zipper is tight you must cut down the rafters to reduce stress on the zipper.
  • Place sod cloth under floor for an air seal and to prevent any rain water from getting on top of floor. Some campers that do not have a floor put the sod cloth to the outside to direct rain water away from area.
  • Install stakes and guy ropes and tensioners. Stakes should be driven in at a 45º angle away from the canvas wall tents. Guy ropes are at the same angle as the tent roof or less depending on personal preference. If I am in an area with high winds I tie my corner guy ropes to trees, stumps or logs. Another method is to use 3' or 4' rebar stakes.
  • Guy ropes. Cut your ropes 8-10 ' long depending on the angle you take the ropes down from your eaves. Tie one end of the rope to the eave D rings. Put the end of the eave rope through one end of tensioner then through the other end of the tensioner. Adjust guy rope and tensioners so there is a loop in the guy rope. Put the guy rope loop behind the stake. Adjust the tensioner to tighten the guy rope.
  • If rain is possible, dig a 4-6" wide trench 2-3" deep around your tent to insure water drains away from your area.
Rope Tightener

Taking Down Canvas Wall Tent:

  • Clean your sod cloth. If your sod cloth is dirty you will get the inside of your tent dirty.
  • Unzip your door zippers.
  • Fold your walls to the inside so the inside of your tent always touches the inside of the walls to keep the inside of your tent cleaner.
  • Take down in reverse order of assembly.

Internal Frames:

  • If your frame is not marked, color code your frame parts, i.e., legs, rafters and frame lengths at 1-2" from ends where the paint will be hidden in the angle joints.
  • Clean Your Frame if the frame has a coating that makes your hands dirty. Dirty hands results in a dirty canvas wall tent.

Tent Maintenance:

  • Zipper Maintenance: Always have zipper unzipped when placing/removing tent over frame to prevent too much stress on zipper. As your roof shrinks the tent will fit tighter on the frame and increase stress on the door zipper.
    • Recommendation: Cut rafters down as necessary to prevent unnecessary stress on zipper. You do not want to be camping in cold weather and have an unserviceable zipper.
  • Mildew: If you have mildew on your canvas wall tent mix 2 cups of bleach in a 5 gallon bucket. Wash only the area with mildew. A tent with mildew will leak at the mildew spot regardless if treated with bleach.
  • Washing Tent: Use only mild detergent like "Woollite". Use a hose and scrub lightly.
  • Storage: Never store a damp or wet tent. Always let it dry naturally. Your tent will get mildew if stored wet regardless if you have a mildew treated canvas.
  • Cleaning: Always brush off caked on dirt or mud (let mud dry) with a soft brush.
  • UV Rays: Long exposure to the sun's UV rays will damage all canvas wall tents. A fly is recommended to prevent UV damage if you set up your tent 2-3 weeks or longer annually. A fly also keeps your roof clean, snow slides off the roof better and acts as another weather barrier.
  • Leaking Seams: Use Canvak or a tent seam sealer to stop leaking seams or purchase a fly.
  • Stoves or Lanterns: Keep stoves, propane cook stoves and lanterns away from canvas.

Set up Location: Be aware of which trees emit resins and avoid setting up your canvas wall tent under these types of trees. wall tent stove.

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STOVE INSTRUCTIONS

Main Factors In Selecting A Tent Stove

  • Tent stove heating capacity
  • Cost
  • Weight
  • Deciding on galvanized, titanium or steel construction
  • Size
  • Options and standard features available on a wall tent stove

Click Wall Tent Stove US for pictures and info on the 35 tent stove and pack stove models by Cylinder Stoves, Four Dog Stove, Kni-Co Stove, Kwik Kamp Stove, Riley Stove, Mountaineer Stove, Titanium Stove, Sims Stove and Idaho Stove. I have a stove or pack stove that will meet your budget and requirement. Tent stove and pack stove prices start at $105.00.

SAFETY: ALL SPARK ARRESTORS WILL BECOME CLOGGED WITH ASH AND SOOT. REMEMBER TO CHECK YOUR SPARK ARRESTOR DAILY AND CLEAN SPARK ARRESTOR AS REQUIRED. USING SOFT WOOD AND LOWER TEMPERATURE STOVE BURNS WILL CAUSE THE SPARK ARRESTOR TO BE CLOGGED SOONER. A CLOGGED SPARK ARRESTOR WILL CAUSE SMOKE TO ESCAPE FROM THE STOVE DOOR INTAKE AND IN EXTREME CASES, A STOVE PIPE FIRE.

CURING THE PAINT ON A NEW CAMPING WOOD STOVE: Set your new stove up in your backyard or driveway and burn wood in the stove for 2-3 hour to cure the paint. Burning wood in your new stove will cause a burning paint smell. You will have this burning smell on your hunting clothes if you do not cure the stove at home before hunting season. HAVE AIR INTAKE ON DOOR ONLY AT ONE THIRD OPENING AT THE BEGINNING. INCREASE AIR INTAKE AFTER 2 HOURS IF ALL THE STOVE PAINT AND PIPE HAS NOT TURNED A DULL COLOR. Different air intake is required on different stoves due to customers using different quality of wood hard vs soft and completely dried vs incompletely dry. THE STOVE AND PIPE IS NOT CURED UNTIL THE ENTIRE TENT STOVE AND PIPE TURNS A DULL COLOR.

Discussion of Wall Tent Stove Features

General: All my stoves have been used for many years and have proven their reliability. I have listed each stove's features thoroughly so you can compare and decide which stove meets your requirements and budget.

Cost: A wall tent stove with the same gauge of metal (thickness) should be very close in price. When comparing wall tent costs ensure you add the cost of options you want as prices for shelves, water tanks and pipes vary significantly between stove companies.

Rolled Steel, Galvanized, Titanium Stoves:

  • Galvanized - Galvanization helps prevent rust. A wise choice when buying a lightweight stove.
  • Titanium - More resistant to burn through and warping. Stronger than steel and weighs about 50% less.
  • Rolled Steel - Non galvanized and will rust quickly if left outside.

Tent Heating Capacity: Most tent stove manufacturers state the very largest tent the stove will heat. You should consider the next larger stove model to ensure you have a warm tent especially for drying out wet clothes and boots if you plan on using a stove in the cold winter months.

Collapsible Stoves vs Non-Collapsible: Stove that collapses for compactness . Unless space is a critical factor, a non-collapsible stove is recommended.

Pellet Stoves: Stoves that burns pellets. Used in environments where wood is unavailable. Some models of pellet stoves burn pellets or wood.

Double Wall Stove: Riley stoves are the only lightweight tent stove company that have both a double bottom and double wall. (Colt models and larger) Riley stoves makes a high quality lightweight stove because the double bottom reduces the chance of a bottom burn out. Riley double wall tent stoves makes for a durable and heat efficient outdoor wood stove.

Weight: Stoves that heat a 12'x14' tent can weigh 30-40 pounds. If you need a stove at a base camp or tent camping near a road buy the stove you need regardless of size or weight.

Packing: Packing smaller stoves fit into panniers easily or as a top pack. Larger stoves can also be easily fit into larger panniers.

Features and Options: Most tent stoves have the same options and features. However, some of the smaller stoves do not have a water tank or shelf that fits into the firebox due to the stove's size.

Storing and Transporting: I prefer a stove that all the accessories fit inside of the firebox for ease of transporting and storing.

Stove Metal Thickness:

  • Gauge - The lower the gauge number, the thicker the rolled steel or galvanized steel. Thicker metal increases strength, durability and weight.
  • Metal Thickness - common gauge thickness used in tent stove construction:
    • 10 gauge .135 inches
    • 12 gauge .105 inches
    • 14 gauge .074 inches
    • 18 gauge .05 inches
    • 22 gauge .03 inches
    • 24 gauge .024 inches

LIGHTWEIGHT STOVES TO PACK IN:

  • Individuals packing in normally take a lightweight stove. However, some individuals take a heavier stove and "cache" it if they use the same hunting camp every year.
  • Collapsible stoves fold down on themselves and are occasionally used by packers. Only about one half of the stove space on a pack horse is saved because the stove pipe and any other accessories must also be packed in. Stove pipe and accessories normally fit inside the firebox of a normal stove. The biggest drawback of a collapsible stove is that the firebox is not airtight and some smoke will in in your tent.
  • Lightweight stoves primary drawback is the thin metal bottom will burn through much faster than the heavier metal stoves. I recommend you put one inch of dirt inside the firebox to reduce the heat on the bottom of the stove firebox. The two most common lightweight stoves used for packing in are the Riley Stoves and Kni-Co stoves. The larger Riley stoves, Colt and larger, have double walls and double stove bottoms and are very durable. However, the Riley stove is much more expensive than the Kni-Co single wall and bottom stoves.
  • A damper for your stove is strongly recommend. I hunt in Wilderness areas and all wood has to be cut by hand. A damper makes your stove 10-15% more efficient. Which means you will reduce the amount of wood you have to cut by 10-15% if you use a damper. This 10-15% increased stove efficiency is very important when you cut wood by hand.

HUNTING TENT STOVE: Carefully review the wood heating stoves characteristics of each stove you are considering, most importantly stove dimensions. To effectively compare each stoves heating capability/size of the firebox multiply the stoves width x length x height to determine the total cubic inches of the firebox. Deduct 15% of the total firebox cubic inches if the stove is round or octagon. The size of the firebox determines the heating capability of the different stoves you are considering. It should be noted that stoves with airtight doors and baffles significantly increases a stoves heating efficiency. If you are in a climate with very cold conditions, you might want to consider moving up one wood heating stove size above the manufacturers tent size heating recommendation.

WOOD COOK STOVE: All my wood burning stoves are very good wood cook stoves. Whatever wood burning stove you purchase will allow you to cook on it.

STOVE AREA REQUIREMENTS IN A TENT: You must plan on a stove taking up to 7 feet along a wall in your tent. There is an automatic 2 + feet standoff from the front wall due to the stove jack location. The stove itself is normally around 2 feet in length. There is normally a 3 feet heat standoff distance from the stove before you can place a cot or table.

STOVE PIPE ABOVE RIDGE OF TENT: It is best to have your stove pipe long enough to extend 6 inches or more above the tent ridge. Having the stove pipe above the tent ridge allows the wind coming from any direction to blow sparks away the tent roof thus reducing the possibility of spark holes being burnt in the roof.

FIRE TREATED CANVAS VS STOVE SPARKS: Stove sparks will even burn holes in a fire treated roof. A spark arrestor will prevent most sparks from reaching your roof. However, the only 100 per cent method to prevent spark holes in a tent roof is to use a fly to protect the roof.

REDUCE SMOKE ODOR IN YOUR HUNTING TENT: To reduce smoke in your tent always open the stove door slowly with the damper wide open. If you open the stove door quickly , the smoke is drawn into the tent.

CREOSOTE BUILD UP IN YOUR STOVE PIPE: The more you damper the stove pipe down or/and reduce the air intake on the stove door the more creosote build up you will have in the stove pipe and spark arrestor. If you get too much creosote in the stove pipe you can possibly have a fire in your stove pipe. When breaking camp, remove the creosote in your stove pipe by gently banging the stove pipes together to loosen the creosote. It is normal to periodically clean the spark arrestor every 2-3 days.

REENACTOR STOVE: The most authentic looking reenactor stove is my 4 Dog stove. All 4 Dog models are a rectangle shape compared to the current round or octagonal shape stoves.

PIPE VS PIPE STOVE OPENING: The stove pipe fits over the pipe opening on the stove.

SPARK ARRESTOR : When properly used this device reduces the amount of sparks coming out of the stove pipe. Check spark arrestor daily to inure there is no buildup of creosote blocking the smoke from going through the spark arrestor.

NON FLAMMABLE AREA around your stove should be a minimum of 2 feet. This 2 foot standoff prevents any flammables from catching fire due to the stove heat, prevents sparks from popping through the air intake openings and catching flammables on fire and also in case sparks pop out when you open the stove door.

WOOD FOR STOVES: Dry hardwoods burn the most efficiently and provide the most heat. If you use soft woods you will have to cut much more firewood and you will have more creosote buildup.

NEVER USE FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS TO START A FIRE IN YOUR STOVE.

WATER HEATER: Install the spigot in the hole in the water tank. Insure you place the rubber washer on the outside of the water tank and the nut on the inside of the tank. Before starting a fire in the stove attach the water tank to the stove by using the brackets. Fill water tank with water. Always keep the water tank filled. A filled water tank prevents the washer on the spigot from melting and also warping the water tank. I recommend you remove the water tank at night to prevent any chance the water tank might go empty.

STOVE EFFICIENCY: It is best to use dry hardwoods. Standing dead trees are usually the driest wood available. However, never cut down a dead tree by yourself. Cut down dead trees at you own risk as it is very dangerous. Always have a spotter watching the top of the tree . Sometimes when a dead tree is about to fall it causes the top 5-10 feet of the tree to break off and can fall on top of you. The result will be a major accident or death.

CAMPING IN WINDY CONDITIONS: Recommend you secure all sections of stove pipe at the joints and where the pipe attaches to the stove with sheet metal screws. Windy conditions will cause the stove pipe to loosen when the tent roof billows in the wind. Also stake down the front and back ridge end of your tent at the grommet on each end of your ridge.

OUTSIDE WOOD STOVES: All my stoves can be an outside wood stove under an overhead tarp/fly. Or completely out in the open depending upon your requirements.

Recommendations

  • Put 1/2" - 1" of dirt or sand in firebox to reduce heat on bottom of stove where most burn outs occur.
  • You can also cut tile to fit the bottom of your stove and then use stove glue to secure the tile. A much better system than using dirt, especially, for long term use.
  • NEVER put your stove on a tent floor or other flammable material.
  • Have a nonflammable area in front of your stove in case sparks or wood falls out of your stove when you open the door.
  • Always ensure your stove is on a level surface to avoid any possible problems.
  • Never allow your stove to get so hot that your stove or stovepipe becomes red. A red hot stove will cause the metal to warp. Reduce airflow on your door air intake to reduce the stove temperature.
  • If you are going camping in the back country I strongly recommend you take a kettle to boil drinking water 5 minutes to prevent guardia lamblia. Water in the water tank normally doesn't boil.
  • I would recommend a stove constructed of 3/32" to 1/8" steel if you are not packing in where weight is a major consideration. The heavier stoves are much more durable and will last much longer.
  • Never store your stove with ash in the firebox. The ash will draw moisture and your stove will rust.
  • If you are going to camp in very cold weather considering purchasing a stove that is one size larger than the stove designed for your size of tent. The one size larger stove will ensure that you stay warmer in very cold or wet conditions. Additionally, you will need a very warm tent to dry out wet boots and clothes.
  • Compare the listed stove heating duration of each stove you are considering vs actual size of its firebox. Some stove manufactures list very long burn times compared to other manufactures with approximately the same size of firebox.
  • Purchase a damper. A damper in the stove pipe does not allow the heat to escape quickly which increases the stove heating efficiency 10-15%.
  • Stove Heating Duration vs Tent Heating Capacity: To me, how long the fire burns at night is more important than tent size heating capability. I need a stove large enough to burn all night to dry my boots and clothes during hunting season.
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WILDERNESS & YUKON STOVE ASSEMBLY INSTRUCTIONS

LEGS: Thread legs into leg inserts (bottom of stove). Hand tighten. Place stove in desired location and level before burning. To level, push legs into ground. Do not place objects under legs to shim stove up. This can make the stove unstable. Lubricate leg threads at least once a year (spray on lubricants work best)

STOVE PIPE: The stove pipe design allows all five sections of pipe to nest inside each other for ease of packing. Each pipe section is tapered, graduating from 5"(pipe section #1) to slightly larger each section. To assemble, stand pipe upright with crimped end down. Remove the #1 section of pipe (smallest) from inside set. Place crimped end inside stove ring (or elbow if needed). Pull pipe #2 out and insert crimped end into top of pipe section #1. Repeat process until all five pipe joints are assembled (may only need to use 4 if going out sidewall) It is recommended that you support your pipe (if going out the sidewall). Windy conditions can cause the pipe to work itself out. A sheet metal screw in each section can help prevent the pipe from pulling apart.

T-CAP: We recommend the use of a T-cap with spark arrestor at all times. The spark arrester keeps large pieces of soot and ash from coming out of the end of the pipe. The T-cap top will keep wind from blowing down the pipe and puffing smoke into your tent (T section of cap should be turned in opposite direction of the wind so it can not blow directly into pipe). The T-cap with spark arrestor is placed in the end of the last section of pipe (mesh screen goes into pipe, T section rests on top of pipe). If the T-cap is too loose inside the pipe, gently pull and stretch mesh portion. T-cap with spark arrestor will eventually get plugged. T-cap must be removed from end of pipe periodically (use protective leather gloves) and tapped on hard surface to prevent/remove creosote build up. If t-Cap gets plugged, the stove will not draw properly.

WATER TANK: The stainless water tank is designed to hang on either side of stove. Set tank down over the flat flange integrated onto either side of stove. Water faucet is transported assembled inside the water tank (to prevent damage in shipment). Before use, remove faucet from inside of tank and place on the outside. Make sure the supplied O-ring is placed inside of the tank. Tighten by hand only. IMPORTANT - water must be kept in tank at all times when tank is attached to the stove. If allowed to run dry, you run the risk of destroying the faucet and/or warping the tank. We recommend removing the water tank at night during sleeping hours. Use protective leather gloves to handle the hot tank. Water will get VERY hot, so please be careful. Wash tank thoroughly before using. SIDE TRAY: The side tray may be mounted on either side or both sides of the stove. Trays mount by inserting pins into holes on top edge of stove.

CURING
Burn the stove thoroughly outside of your tent for the first time. The galvanized pipe and elbow and the painted surfaces of the stove will smoke slightly and give off a nasty odor during the first burn. We recommend setting up the stove in your back yard and fully burning it before use in the field. Burn at one-half to three-quarter damper. Once the fire is going, close the door and try not to touch it for at least two hours. The stove paint needs to cure (the paint is very susceptible before & during curing). If you must initiate first burn in your tent, simply open all doors and windows for at least two hours during the first time.

USE
The burn times and BTU outputs were derived from using dry Tamarack wood during burn test. Any variety of wood may be used for fuel in the stove. Different types of wood will more than likely give you different burn times and heat outputs. Keep in mind that dry wood times burns much more efficiently than green wood. Green wood will create more creosote in the pipe and spark arrestor and will put off less heat than cured firewood. Creosote will also build up when stove is burned at a low damper setting for long periods of time. Try to burn on a medium0high setting one or two times a day to burn and creosote build up in the pipe. DO NOT ALLOW STOVE TO BURN SO HOT IT TURNS RED!! T-cap with spark arrestor must be removed from end of pipe (use protective leather gloves) and tapped on a hard surface to prevent/remove creosote build up. If T-cap gets plugged, the stove will not draw properly. Always crack the door slightly for a few seconds to allow the stove additional draw before fully opening door. The stove can build up large amounts of smoke inside and needs the extra draw to pull it out the pipe. You can build a fire directly on the floor of the stove without fear of burning through, however, the stove will perform best with a bed of dirt/ash in it.

When starting a fire, use small pieces of dry kindling and crack door open until fire gets going well(this is very important). Once fire is going, YOU MUST close the door. Place damper in full open position until stove gets up to temperature (then damper as desired). Keeping the door open for too long can cause damage to the stove. Only open it enough to get the fire going. For the most heat: use smaller pieces of split wood with damper fully open.
For longer burn times: Use large pieces of wood with damper 1/8 to open (best at night)

SAFETY: ALL SPARK ARRESTORS WILL BECOME CLOGGED WITH ASH AND SOOT. REMEMBER TO CHECK YOUR SPARK ARRESTOR DAILY AND CLEAN SPARK ARRESTOR AS REQUIRED. USING SOFT WOOD AND LOWER TEMPERATURE STOVE BURNS WILL CAUSE THE SPARK ARRESTOR TO BE CLOGGED SOONER. A CLOGGED SPARK ARRESTOR WILL CAUSE SMOKE TO ESCAPE FROM THE STOVE DOOR INTAKE AND IN EXTREME CASES, A STOVE PIPE FIRE.



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